What Is A Lucky 15?

Have you ever wondered what a Lucky 15 was? Well Gaz breakdowns the popular bet type and also explains the less common Lucky 31 and Lucky 63.

What is a Lucky 15?

If you’ve ever been in a bookmaker’s shop, the chances are you’ve heard the term Lucky 15. Terms like these can seem very complicated, but in reality they are pretty simple. A Lucky 15 gets it’s name from the fact it is made up of 15 bets. This type of bet has become extremely popular over the last number of years, but it does have its pitfalls so make sure to read the following carefully.

How Many Selections Do I Need For A Lucky 15?

When placing a Lucky 15 you will be asked to enter four selections. These can be horses, dogs, football teams or anything else you fancy. You can even pick a mix of sports if you wish.

How Do Four Selections Make 15 bets?

That’s easy! Lucky 15’s aim to cover all possible permutations therefore the four selections you have chosen will be spread across 4 Singles, 6 Doubles, 4 Trebles and one accumulator. In short, the Lucky 15 is fifteen bets covering every possible combination of your four selections. If you’re totally new to betting you can learn more about singles, doubles, trebles and accumulators in our easy to follow overview.

SRD Tip: Think it through before combining selections.

When placing a Lucky 15 you should always ensure it is the correct type of “cover bet” to suit your selections. There is no set rule here but if your selections are all low prices then this style of bet might not be for you. It is always a personal choice and some bettors will be happy with any sort of return on investment. However, the low return from the single portion of the bet will not be attractive to many punters. If your selections are all (or mostly) very low odds then a bet like a Yankee may suit you better.

How Much Does A Lucky 15 Cost?

A Lucky 15 will cost 15 times your desired stake essentially applying the same stake to the 15 bets listed above. If you place a £1 Lucky 15 it will cost you £15.

SRD Tip: Choose your bookmaker wisely.

Before placing a Lucky 15 you should ALWAYS read the bookmaker terms and conditions. Some bookmakers advertise promotions such as “Best Odds Guaranteed” but in the small print they will state that these promotions do not apply to “cover bets”. This can have a big impact on your pay-out, particularly when backing horses as their prices can swing significantly. Lucky 15’s are convenient but if a bookmaker is not offering your desired promotion, it is more beneficial to work out the 15 permutations yourself, and place these bets individually.

Do All My Selections Need To Win?

No. The joy of a Lucky 15 is that you receive some sort of pay-out if just one of your four selections manages to win. The more winners you have, the more the return will increase. If you get “Lucky” and all four selections end up winning you’ll be in for a big pay-out.

SRD Tip: Look out for bookmaker bonuses!

Many bookmakers offer a bonus if all four of your selections win. This can be as high as 100% therefore you should shop around and know the terms before placing your bet.

Can I Place an Each Way Lucky 15?

Yes you can however this is in essence two separate Lucky 15’s, a win L15 and an each-way L15. The each-way L15 follows normal each way rules. An each-way L15 will cost you 30 times your stake.

What Is A Lucky 31?

A Lucky 31 is very similar to a Lucky 15 apart from two differences. In a Lucky 31 you will need to choose 5 selections. This increase of selections means that there are more permutations to cover and therefore the number of bets increase from 15 to 31. A Lucky 31 is made up of 5 Singles, 10 Doubles, 10 Trebles, 5 Four-Folds and an accumulator.

What Is A Lucky 63?

You’ve probably guessed it already but a Lucky 63 works on the same basis as a L15 or a L31, with two differences. In a Lucky 63 you will need to make 6 selections. This means there are yet more permutations to cover and therefore the number of bets increase. A Lucky 63 is made up of 6 Singles, 15 Doubles, 20 Trebles, 15 Four-Folds, 6 Five-Folds and an accumulator.

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